Archives for posts with tag: Coffee LAB
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Clockwise from top left: Museum rooftop selfie, Mount Ushba from the museum rooftop, Svan tower, millet tchvishtari

Mariamoba was on a Tuesday this year, and since my Monday classes took a summer vacation, that gave me a 4-day weekend; actually enough time to go a little further afield. G had never been to Svaneti, and my previous trip was far from enough, so we decided to make a weekend of it. We planned to leave mid-day Saturday, but work intervened, so we didn’t leave until late afternoon. Our plan was to drive to Zugdidi to spend the night there, break up the drive, and spend some time with G’s relatives. The thing that had come loose on the car on our trip to Poka was making noise again, and there was heavy traffic, so it took longer than planned and we didn’t get in to Zugdidi until quite late. We got to hang out with the family a bit in the morning, though. One of the little ones is book-obsessed and loved the board books I had brought her, so we got along swimmingly.

We left Zugdidi around noon and drove into Svaneti. We’d stopped at the Enguri dam and taken photos before, so we skipped that stop, but did pull off for the odd scenic pitstop. It took about three and a half hours to get to Mestia. Just outside Mestia, we picked up a group of hitchhikers, who were a great boon to us. They were all Tbilisi Svan English teachers spending their summer vacation in their ancestral home. They called a friend of theirs who ran a guesthouse and hooked us up with a cheap, clean guesthouse with a private bathroom. They also gave us some restaurant and sightseeing advice, and were just generally very nice and helpful. Unfortunately I didn’t catch any of their names, but one of them works with one of my co-workers (small country), so hopefully I can meet her again and say thank you.

After dropping our stuff off in the room we went for a wander in the town and relaxed a bit in the park at Seti Square, and then went to make sure we made it to the Svaneti museum before they closed. I’m really glad we made it to the museum; it’s small but well-presented and really worth visiting. I found the display of coins left at the churches really interesting in their age and geographic range. After seeing the exhibits, we climbed to the museum roof to see the panoramic view of Mestia and take some photos. We finished the day at Koshki Bar (also recommended by our hitchhikers for kubdari). I was surprised that a place next to the bus station would be so good…it’s usually better to walk further afield. The menu was extensive, and despite all my years in Georgia, I wasn’t familiar with all the dishes. We were discussing what to order in our usual mish-mash of Georgian and English, and the waitress kept right up, speaking to us in both languages.  We wound up ordering the kubdari (the Svanetian version of khachapuri, filled with spiced meat), the house salad (which the waitress made sure we knew was made with beef tongue) and a tchvishtari (Svanetian cheesy cornbread, a favorite of mine) made with millet. Everything was delicious, though I thought the tchvishtari was a little on the salty side. When I went to the restroom, I noticed in the refrigerator a legit-looking chocolate cake, so I splurged and had dessert and did not regret it in the least. It was one of the best cakes I’ve had in Georgia. Walking around Mestia I was struck by how different it was than four years ago. Then there were lots of empty new buildings and not many people around. This time, Mestia was vibrant! Tourists and locals alike were playing in the park, strolling along the streets, and eating in cafes. There were far fewer empty storefronts, but there were still cows walking down the main street and old men in traditional hats minding their own business. Right now, they’ve hit the balance between tradition and development right on the head for me…I desperately hope they manage to hold onto that balance, as the place is only going to keep getting more and more popular.

After sleeping in the next morning, I started the day with my first-ever flat white at Erti Kava which brews my beloved Coffee Lab beans and has a really extensive drink menu including the lovely flower fairy tea from the baths (…must find the name of that brand!). We had a breakfast that was really more of a lunch at Cafe Panorama  where I sampled their version of millet tchvistari (I preferred Koshki’s version, but this was also very good) and G had a massive plate of ojakhuri (pork and potatoes cooked together…this version included some wine, too). We walked down to the riverside and relaxed and listened to the rushing water for a while. Then we walked to the Hatsvali Ski Lift. The idea was to take the ski lift up, and go for a short hike/long walk once we were at the top. However, the ski lift was closed for repairs. Given what happened at Gudauri last winter, this is probably for the best, but it was annoying that the sign said the lift would reopen on August 10, and we were well past that with no information on when it would actually reopen. Our plans were foiled, so we wandered around the town for a while and returned to Seti Square, where G to a little nap to digest his ojakhuri. After another little wander through the other part of the town, we had dinner at Buba, which was recomended by our hostess for kubdari. G was still pretty full, so we didn’t order it, though. We got “Svan fries” (french fries with Svanetian salt), millet khachapuri (which was amazing! I think the millet was mixed in with the cheese rather than the used for the dough, though, so I think it still contained wheat) and chicken soup (which may also have contained millet). All the food was really good.

Tuesday was Mariamoba, which is apparently a particularly big deal in Svaneti, but we had to drive back to Tbilisi. Only Laila was open for breakfast but their breakfast menu was limited and kind of disappointing, so G decided to wait and I grabbed a packaged croissant and a banana from the market and returned to Erti Kava for a latte. They also had a little bit of quiche left (they don’t sell much food, but apparently have some), so I got a piece and was quite satisfied with my breakfast. We set off, and stopped along the road for G to have his last taste of kubdari in Khaishi. Despite the holiday, traffic wasn’t too bad on the highway, so we made it back to Tbilisi in decent time.

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Inspired by my friend Chloe’s monthly food favorites, I’m going to start profiling my favorite new things in Georgia each season. See all my past favorites here. I’ll try to focus on things, people, places, and organizations that are brand new, but it’s possible that I’ll be late to the party on something, or there’s something that’s just new-to-me and so amazing that I’ll still choose to include it. I don’t mean to be solely food-focused, but that seems to happen sometimes…

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Top: Falafel and hummus from Different Taste. Row 2 L to R: Nutella khachapuri from Sakhachapure No1, Cubano from Begemot, bread from Kakhelebi. Row 3: Chreli Abano, latte and Oreo cheesecake from Coffee LAB, Herbia spinach

Begemot/Woland’s  A cute little bookshop with tasty food and its sister speakeasy, which serves up delicious cocktails in a calm environment. Amazing bar snacks and free tap water!

Chreli Abano Renovations: If you’ve been to Tbilisi and visited Abanotubani, you’ve probably seen that gorgeous blue building that was blocked off and closed. Maybe you thought it as a mosque (lots of people do–the mosque is one street up the hill, FYI). This is Chreli Abano, or the Blue Bath or the Pushkin Bath. And it’s open again, and it is a wonderful simple luxury. They’ve done a great job with the renovations, and the place looks beautiful and feels clean. The staff speak English, and they have a menu of extras available–if you forgot your slippers or shampoo they’ll help you out, and they also brew some delicious herbal teas to help you feel warm and healthy during your bath.

CoffeeLab: Great coffee, and fresh affordable food in a lovely building nestled in a park. Their coffee is confirmed to have turned non-coffee drinkers into coffee snobs!

Different Taste Falafel: I first noticed this cheap little hole in the wall lunch place a few months ago, and thought I would stop by sometime when I was in the neighborhood and didn’t pack my lunch. Recently I walked past and spotted a little hand-written sign that read “New Falafel and Hummus from Israel”. The first time I stopped in I wasn’t sure what to expect, but when I overheard the staff discussing a trip to Israel I became optimistic. The hummus and falafel were delicious, and a steal. A good-sized portion of hummus and falafel with a side of bread and a cup of tea is only 7.50 GEL. Unfortunately, they don’t have pita bread, but the garlicky toast that comes with the hummus and falafel is pretty good. It’s the only thing I’ve tried here, but their Facebook reviews suggest that the baked goods are tasty, too.

Herbia Spinach: I never knew I liked spinach so much until I learned how hard it was to find spinach regularly in Georgia. Herbia has changed that with greenhouse-grown packaged spinach regularly available at your local grocery store. Always fresh and clean and delicious, I have been happily eating spinach nearly once a week now. (Smitten Kitchen’s recipe for spinach and chickpeas is a favorite!)

Kakhelebi bread: This restaurant gets frequent reviews as one of the best places to try farm-fresh innovative Georgian food. Those reviews are well-deserved. What I don’t understand is why it took so long for anyone to tell me they also have a bakery! Multiple kinds of delicious, freshly baked artisan breads are available. Don’t get me wrong; I love Georgian tonis puri, but it usually isn’t a good shape for slicing for toast or sandwiches. Kakhelebi’s bread solves this problem! It’s also a good distance from my house for a morning walk. Beware, they close unusually early for a Tbilisi restaurant.

Nutella Khachapuri at Sakhachapure N1 : I can’t believe it took someone so long to invent this! It’s the perfect comfort dessert; an adjaruli bread boat made of puff pastry, filled with a load of nutella and topped with some fruit. The perfect indulgent dessert!

 

If you have any suggestions for something new and great in Georgia, let me know–I’ll try to check it out, and perhaps it will make a future favorites list.

These aren’t the fanciest, most impressive places in Tbilisi, and they aren’t necessarily the most diverse, but these are the places I keep going back to due to convenience, tastiness and/or tradition. I can’t say I’m enough of a regular that the staff recognize me (well, not at most places), but these are the places where I’ve tried enough things that I don’t have to look at the menu to know what I want and I keep going back for more of it. They may not be the most iconic Tbilisi places or have typical Georgian food, but they’ve definitely got my stamp of approval!

Begemot
The place:
A comfy, cozy place full of books and great light fare
What I order: Cubano, homemade potato chips, iced tea or a latte

Coffee LAB
The place: I suppose it’s more Nina who’s a regular here, but I’ve tagged along often enough to know the place, too. Great coffee and a nice affordable and fresh menu. The view into the treetops of the park from the top floor is lovely and peaceful.
What I order: chicken wrap (or mushroom sandwich), oreo cheesecake (which is served in more pudding form, but amazing anyway), tall espresso with milk

Culinarium: Khasheria
The place: An after-banya tradition with the girls! Modern, delicious takes on hearty traditional Georgian dishes.
What I order: 
hot salad, chicken, beef cheeks, whole wheat bread, dips, house wine

Dunkin’ Donuts
The place:
A very popular American transplant, Georgian Dunkin’ Donuts also makes some really good Georgian pastries! It seems to be the only place left in town for a bagel (I always find the donuts themselves a bit underwhelming., though) Also a good place to pop in and use the toilet when you’re running around town.
What I order: New York bagel, lobiani, pumpkin spice latte

Entree
The place:
When I first came to Tbilisi, this local chain was one of the few places with WiFi, and I spent a LOT of time here. Not the case anymore, but still a good place to pop in for breakfast or a snack on the run.
What I order: Oranais, chocolate and almond croissant (on the rare occasion they have it) latte

Literaturuli Cafe
The place: Another favorite from way back when, and another bookstore cafe. There are at least two locations in Tbilisi still open.
What I order: lobiani

Pelmeni 1
The place:
A hole-in-the-wall of a place in a parking lot across the street from Isani metro station. The food is fantastic and cheap, but unfortunately the smokers have overtaken the formerly-non-smoking section.
What I order: uralskij pelmeni, hand-cut french fries

Ronny’s Pizza
The place:
Georgia’s best American pizza place, which has recently added a few locations. They also deliver.
What I order: Wild West (barbecue chicken and roasted garlic) pizza, root beer

Sakhachapure #1
The place:
A local chain that my friend from Batumi proclaimed the best adjaruli outside of Adjara, with many convenient locations. Also, props to them for making a dessert khachapuri–it took too long!
What I order: adjaruli khachapuri, “house dessert” (basically Nutella khachapuri), Laghidze water

Seoul
The place:
Delicious Korean food conveniently located around the corner from one of my work locations. I’ve never been to Korea, but I assume the food is pretty good as the place is usually full of Koreans.
What I order: bibimbap (comes with soup and kimchi), tea

Tashir Pizza
The place:
An Armenian chain that has recently expanded to Tbilisi (mostly in shopping malls). Though “pizza” is in the name, I’ve always ordered from the sushi menu, and I haven’t been disappointed (remember, though, that I’m a Midwesterner, so my sushi experience may differ from yours).
What I order: sushi with smoked salmon and avocado

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